A “desire path” is the term for a trail worn down by foot traffic to create a shorter distance between two points. You’ll usually see them slicing through the grass on the quads of college campuses. Desire paths represent user innovation: a faster route through parks or other public spaces, a more direct line between two areas people want to go. 

 A “desire path” is the term for a trail worn down by foot traffic to create a shorter distance between two points. You’ll usually see them slicing through the grass on the quads of college campuses. Desire paths represent user innovation: a faster route through parks or other public spaces, a more direct line between two areas people want to go. 

"Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle "Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."
          - Laura Battle

"Surely whoever invented the wheel must have been looking up. When we look at the moon, we consider our place in the universe and imagine destinations beyond our reach. We look to the orbit of the planets around the sun to understand night and day. We leave in the morning, we return at night. Motors, industry, and ultimately transportation itself were no doubt born out of this singular encounter between man and sphere."

          - Laura Battle

“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn
“Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”
            - Irving Penn

Sensitive people faced with the prospect of a camera portrait put on a face they think is the one they would like to show to the world… Every so often what lies behind the facade is rare and more wonderful than the subject knows or dares to believe.”

            - Irving Penn

Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae
A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye


The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.
Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.
Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?
Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.
I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:
What exactly is a diatom?
Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.
So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?
The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.
- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist

Secretive Victorian Artists Made These Intricate Patterns Out of Algae

A new documentary profiles Klaus Kemp, the sole practicioner of a quirky art form that is invisible to the naked eye

The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.

Since seeing his first diatom arrangement—an intricate pattern of algae crafted by German microscopist J.D. Möller—Matthew Killip has been enthralled with the Victorian art form. “I love seeing the hand of man display the work of nature so beautifully,” he says.

Almost immediately, the British filmmaker had two questions. First, how did these 19th-century artists manage to assemble diatoms, each just microns long, into dazzling shapes invisible to the naked eye? And secondly, is anyone still working in this medium?

Killip’s search for answers led him to Klaus Kemp, the only living practicioner. He spent an afternoon with the eccentric Englishman, cameras rolling, and produced the documentary, seen above, called “The Diatomist.” The short film was released this week.

I interviewed Killip by email to find out more about this lost art:

What exactly is a diatom?

Diatoms are microscopic single-cell algae housed in beautiful glass shells. There are hundreds of thousands of varieties of diatoms all with unique forms.

So when and how did diatom arrangement emerge as an art form?

The first diatom arrangements date back to the early 1800s, but the art form reached its peak in the latter part of the century. It was a period of intense interest in the natural world and also a time when the arts and sciences were more closely aligned. Diatom arrangements are a stunning example of that particularly Victorian desire to bring order to the world, to display nature in a rational way.

- Source: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/secretive-victorian-artists-made-these-intricate-patterns-out-of-algae-180952720/?no-ist